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How COVID-19 Vaccines Work | Safety Guides to Know Of

To understand how COVID-19 vaccines work, it helps to first look at how our bodies fight illness. When germs, such as the virus that causes COVID-19, invade our bodies, they attack and multiply. This invasion, called an infection, is what causes illness. The same case applies to COVID-19, and that’s why it’s important to stay cautious.

Additionally, COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. In this article, we’ll look into details of how COVID-19 Vaccines work.

How COVID-19 Vaccines Work

The good news is that; the COVID-19 vaccines material never enters the nucleus of the cell — which is where our DNA is kept. Equally important, none of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests — which are used to see if you have a current infection.​ Let’s now have a look at how COVID-19 vaccines work in detail.

What Are COVID-19 Vaccines? 

First of all, the COVID-19 vaccine introduction toolbox equips all countries to prepare for and implement COVID-19 vaccination by providing guidance, tools, and training. This toolbox is intended to support Ministries of Health, health workers, partner organizations, and other stakeholders.

However, the federal government (e.g. Kenya) does not mandate (require) vaccination for people. Additionally, CDC does not maintain or monitor a person’s vaccination records. Whether a state or local government or employer, for example, can require or mandate COVID-19 vaccination is a matter of state or another applicable law external icon.

Secondly, it’s important to realize, none of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. Meaning, that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19.

Sometimes, this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. But, these symptoms are normal! And they are signs that our body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Related: COVID-19 Pandemic | 10 Protective guides you need so far

Basically, there are strict protections in place to help ensure the safety of all COVID-19 vaccines. Before receiving validation from WHO and national regulatory agencies, COVID-19 vaccines must undergo rigorous testing in clinical trials. In order to prove that they meet internationally agreed benchmarks for safety and efficacy.

As with all vaccines, WHO and regulatory authorities will continuously monitor the use of COVID-19 vaccines too. More so, in order to identify and respond to any safety issues that might arise, and through that process to assure they remain safe for use around the world.

What You Need to Know:
  • COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective.
  • You may have side effects after vaccination, but these are normal.
  • It typically takes two weeks after you are fully vaccinated for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus.
  • If you are not vaccinated, find a vaccine. But, keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated.
  • If you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic.

Secondly, if your body develops an immune response to COVID-19 Vaccines vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus.

Bearing in mind, our immune system uses several tools to fight infection. Blood contains red cells, which carry oxygen to tissues and organs, and white or immune cells, which fight infection. Different types of white blood cells fight infection in different ways.

Consider the following:
  • Macrophages are white blood cells that swallow up and digest germs and dead or dying cells. The macrophages leave behind parts of the invading germs, called “antigens”. The body identifies antigens as dangerous and stimulates antibodies to attack them.
  • B-lymphocytes are defensive white blood cells. They produce antibodies that attack the pieces of the virus left behind by the macrophages.
  • T-lymphocytes are another type of defensive white blood cell. They attack cells in the body that have already been infected.

The first time a person is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, it can take several days or weeks for their body to make and use all the germ-fighting tools needed to get over the infection. After the infection, the person’s immune system remembers what it learned about how to protect the body against that disease.

The body keeps a few T-lymphocytes, called “memory cells,” that go into action quickly if the body encounters the same virus again. When the familiar antigens are detected, B-lymphocytes produce antibodies to attack them. Experts are still learning how long these memory cells protect a person against the virus that causes COVID-19.

The Immune System — The Body’s Defense Against Infection 

To understand how COVID-19 vaccines work, it helps to first look at how our bodies fight illness. When germs, such as the virus that causes COVID-19, invade our bodies, they attack and multiply.

This invasion, called an infection, is what causes illness. Our immune system uses several tools to fight infection. Blood contains red cells, which carry oxygen to tissues and organs, and white or immune cells, which fight infection. Different types of white blood cells fight infection in different ways.

Consider the following:
  • Macrophages: These are white blood cells that swallow up and digest germs and dead or dying cells. The macrophages leave behind parts of the invading germs, called “antigens”. The body identifies antigens as dangerous and stimulates antibodies to attack them.
  • B-lymphocytes: These are defensive white blood cells. They produce antibodies that attack the pieces of the virus left behind by the macrophages.
  • T-lymphocytes: These are another type of defensive white blood cell. They attack cells in the body that have already been infected.

The first time a person is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, it can take several days or weeks for their body to make and use all the germ-fighting tools needed to get over the infection. After the infection, the person’s immune system remembers what it learned about how to protect the body against that disease.

The body keeps a few T-lymphocytes, called “memory cells,” that go into action quickly if the body encounters the same virus again. When the familiar antigens are detected, B-lymphocytes produce antibodies to attack them. Experts are still learning how long these memory cells protect a person against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Learn More: Coronavirus Symptoms | 5 Self Isolation Best Practices

In terms of allergic reactions, severe allergic reactions have occurred rarely to some of the COVID vaccines. A severe allergic reaction – such as anaphylaxis – is a potential but rare side effect of any vaccine. Especially, in persons with a known risk, such as the previous experience of an allergic reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine.

Or any of the known components in the vaccine. On that note, WHO recommends that healthcare providers assess the risk for severe allergic reactions prior to giving a COVID-19 vaccine. More so, by inquiring about previous reactions or known allergies to any components in the vaccine.

All immunization providers should be trained to recognize severe allergic reactions and take steps to treat such reactions if they occur. Furthermore, COVID-19 Vaccine use is being closely monitored by national authorities and international bodies. Including WHO, to detect serious side effects, including any unexpected reactions.

This is helping them better understand and manage the specific risks of allergic reactions or other serious side effects of COVID-19 vaccines. Particularly, those that may not have been detected during clinical trials. Whilst, ensuring safe vaccination for all.

How COVID-19 Vaccines Work

Remarkably, COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection. But with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes.

As well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future. That said, you can consider the following video tutorial for more guidelines before you proceed.

It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to produce T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination.

And then, the person gets sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection. Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building immunity.

Always Remember,

That there are a few main novel coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines. Pfizer, now known by the name Comirnaty Vaccine, received full approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Aug. 23 to be used for people ages 16 and older.

Comirnaty and Moderna — which have emergency-use authorization for ages 18 and older — are two-dose messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines. These vaccines include a fragment of the mRNA that encodes for a certain portion of the coronavirus’ spike protein.

When the vaccine is given to us, our cells make that protein — a fragment of it — and then our bodies build an immune response to the protein. The single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a DNA vaccine, but it delivers the same product in the end as the Comirnaty and Moderna mRNA vaccines.

This new DNA vaccine allows the body to have an immune response against the spike protein — and ultimately, an immune response to infection is built.

Which are the Types of COVID-19 Vaccines?

At least 52 candidate vaccines are in human trials. There are several others currently in phase I/II, which will enter phase III in the coming months. Of the vaccines that do make it to clinical trials, just one in five is successful. Having lots of different vaccines in development increases the chances that there will be one or more successful vaccines.

More so, that will be shown to be safe and efficacious for the intended prioritized populations. Currently, as seen in the video below, there are roughly three main types of COVID-19 vaccines. And, only three of them are actually authorized and recommended or undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials.

Their differences lie in whether they use a whole virus or bacterium. For instance, just the parts of the germ that triggers the immune system. Or just the genetic material that provides the instructions for making specific proteins and not the whole virus.

Below is a description of how each type of vaccine prompts our bodies — in order to recognize and protect us from the virus that causes COVID-19. But, none of these vaccines can give you COVID-19. So, they are all safe for human vaccination.

mRNA Vaccines:

Technically, the mRNA Vaccine contains material from the virus that causes COVID-19 that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine.

Not forgetting, our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there. And, as a result, they build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.

Protein Subunit Vaccines:

As for the Protein Subunit Vaccines, they include harmless pieces (proteins) of the virus that causes COVID-19 instead of the entire germ. Once vaccinated, our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there and build T-lymphocytes and antibodies that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.

Vector Vaccines:

In the same way, Vector Vaccines (aka Viral Vector Vaccines) contain a modified version of a different virus than the one that causes COVID-19. Inside the shell of the modified virus, there is material from the virus that causes COVID-19.

That’s why it’s called a “viral vector.” Once the viral vector is inside our cells, the genetic material gives cells instructions to make a protein that is unique to the virus that causes COVID-19. Using these instructions, our cells make copies of the protein.

This prompts our bodies to build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus if we are infected in the future. You can read and learn more about the Different Types of COVID-19 Vaccines in this article for more details.

What are the Benefits of Vaccination?

On the contrary, the benefits of the COVID-19 Astra Zeneca and Janssen vaccines are far greater than the very small risk of TTS. As well as protecting you from severe disease and death due to COVID-19. Now that being vaccinated alone can protect you against complications from ‘long COVID.’

But, in order to be fully safe, make sure that you provide some protection for your close contacts and community. By reducing transmission, and as such, all this can reduce the risk of severe disease from some variant strains. WHO recommends that these vaccines continue to be used to protect priority groups.

Generally, all vaccine safety monitoring is ensured at the national, regional, and global levels. As is standard practice in all national immunization programs, WHO supports the set up of safety monitoring systems for COVID-19 vaccines in every country. Whereby, after a COVID-19 vaccine is introduced in a country, WHO works with vaccine manufacturers.

Learn More: Hand Sanitizer | Best Practices For Personal Hygiene

It also works with health officials, and other partners to monitor for any safety concerns on an ongoing basis. Specific safety concerns that may arise are evaluated by WHO.

These safety concerns are also addressed by an independent group of experts (the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, or GACVS). Not forgetting, it’s also done in conjunction with the relevant national authorities. In nutshell, COVID-19 vaccines are safe for so many reasons so far as listed below.

Consider the following. It’s because:
  • they were developed using science that has been around for decades.
  • are not experimental. They went through all the required stages of clinical trials.
  • have extensive testing and monitoring that have shown that these vaccines are safe and effective.
  • have received and continue to undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history.
  • can keep you from getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • also, they help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.

So, should I take a blood thinner a few days before taking the vaccine, given reports of blood clotting caused by the vaccination? No, you should not take a blood thinner unless your healthcare provider has prescribed that medication to treat an existing health condition.

Keeping in mind, Covid-19 vaccines are safe for people taking blood thinners though. But, you should let the person giving you the vaccine know about any medication you are taking.

What are the side effects of COVID-19 vaccines?

Like any vaccine, COVID-19 vaccines can cause mild, short-term side effects. Such as a low-grade fever or pain or redness at the injection site. Most reactions to vaccines are mild and go away within a few days on their own. More serious or long-lasting side effects to vaccines are possible but extremely rare.

The chances of any of these side effects following vaccination differ according to the specific COVID-19 vaccine. If at all, the reported side effects to COVID-19 vaccines have mostly been mild to moderate and short-lasting.

The most common side effects include:
  • fever,
  • fatigue,
  • headache,
  • muscle pain,
  • chills,
  • diarrhea,
  • pain at the injection site, etc.

You can always contact your care provider if the tenderness (pain) where you got the injection increases after 24 hours. Or if the side effects do not go away within a couple of days. Likewise, if you’ll have difficulty breathing, chest pain, confusion, loss of speech, or mobility, call a healthcare provider immediately.

What about the Delta Variant?

On July 27, 2021, CDC released updated guidance on the need for urgently increasing COVID-19 vaccination coverage. And, as such, they recommend for everyone in areas of substantial or high transmission wear a mask in public indoor places, even if they are fully vaccinated.

CDC issued this new guidance due to several concerning developments and newly emerging data signals. First, a significant increase in new cases reversed what had been a steady decline since January 2021. In the days leading up to this guidance update, CDC saw a rapid and alarming rise in the COVID-19 cases.

There were also massive hospitalization rates around the country. In late June, the 7-day moving average of reported cases was around 12,000. On July 27, the 7-day moving average of cases reached over 60,000. This case rate looked more like the rate of cases we had seen before the vaccine was widely available.

Related: Self Quarantine | What does It mean in Simple terms?

Second, new data began to emerge that the Delta variant was more infectious and was leading to increased transmissibility when compared with other variants, even in some vaccinated individuals. This includes recently published data from CDC and our public health partners.

More so, in regards to unpublished surveillance data that will be publicly available in the coming weeks. As well as the information included in CDC’s updated Science Brief on COVID-19 Vaccines and Vaccination, and ongoing outbreak investigations linked to the Delta variant. Notably, the Delta Variant is currently the predominant variant of the virus in many states.

Having said that, you can read and learn more about its infections and spread rate in this article as explained in detail. The Delta Variant causes more infections and spreads faster than earlier forms of the virus that causes COVID-19. It might cause more severe illness than previous strains in unvaccinated people. But, there’s some good news to the other side of the story.

Consider the following:
  • These vaccines continue to reduce a person’s risk of contracting the virus that causes COVID-19, including this variant.
  • They also continue to be highly effective at preventing hospitalization (against this variant) and death.
  • Fully vaccinated people with breakthrough infections from this variant appear to be infectious for a shorter period.
  • Lastly, get vaccinated and wear masks indoors in public spaces to reduce the spread of this variant.

Overall, once you are fully vaccinated, you can start doing more. For instance, you can resume many activities that you did before the pandemic. However, CDC recommends that fully vaccinated people wear a mask in public indoor settings. That’s if they are in an area of substantial or high transmission.

Fully vaccinated people might choose to mask regardless of the level of transmission. Particularly, if they or someone in their household is immunocompromised or at increased risk for severe disease, or if someone is unvaccinated.

Related: COVID 19 Virus | How Does It Spread & Last On Surfaces?

Not to mention, people who are at increased risk for severe disease include older adults and those who have certain medical conditions. Such as diabetes, overweight or obesity, and heart conditions. Equally, people are not considered fully vaccinated until 2 weeks after their second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

Or rather, 2 weeks after a single dose of Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. In that case, you should keep using all the tools available to protect yourself and others until you are fully vaccinated. You can learn more about COVID-19 vaccination for people with underlying medical conditions or weakened immune systems in detail.

Some COVID-19 Vaccines Require More Than One Shot

In reality, vaccine recalls or withdrawals due to safety issues are rare. Recalls are usually initiated voluntarily by a vaccine manufacturer before any adverse events are reported. For example, ongoing monitoring of vaccine production may show that an irregularity has caused a batch of vaccines to lose their strength.

In this case, people who have received a vaccine from that batch may need to be vaccinated again to ensure they are protected. Suspected safety events officially reported to WHO go through a series of rapid verification steps. With some of them involving an independent panel of experts. WHO shares the results of these evaluations on its website.

WHO also coordinates with local, regional, and national health officials to investigate vaccine safety concerns and advise on the next steps. Information is also made available through the Vaccine Safety Net too.

None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. To be fully vaccinated, you will need two shots of some COVID-19 vaccines.

Consider the following:
  • Two shots: If you get a COVID-19 vaccine that requires two shots, you are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after your second shot. Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines require two shots.
  • One-Shot: If you get a COVID-19 vaccine that requires one shot, you are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after your shot. Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine only requires one shot.

If it has been less than two weeks since your shot, or if you still need to get your second shot, you are NOT fully protected. Keep taking steps to protect yourself and others until you are fully vaccinated (two weeks after your final shot). You can learn more about what you can do when you have been fully vaccinated in detail.

Let’s Bust Common Myths and Learn the Facts

Of course, Yes! mRNA vaccines, such as Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, work differently than other types of vaccines, but they still trigger an immune response inside your body. This type of vaccine is new, but research and development on it have been underway for decades.

On one side, the mRNA vaccines do not contain any live viruses. Instead, they work by teaching our cells to make a harmless piece of a “spike protein,” which is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19. On the other side, the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine technology has been rigorously assessed for safety and clinical trials.

Whereby, it has shown that mRNA vaccines produce an immune response that has high efficacy against disease. After all, mRNA vaccine technology has been studied for several decades. Including in the contexts of Zika, rabies, and influenza vaccines. mRNA vaccines are not live virus vaccines and do not interfere with human DNA.

Related: Face Mask | How to Make it, Wear it & Remove it Rightly

After making the protein piece, cells display it on their surface. Our immune system then recognizes that it does not belong there and responds to get rid of it. When an immune response begins, antibodies are produced. Creating the same response that happens in a natural infection.

In contrast to mRNA vaccines, many other vaccines use a piece of, or weakened version of, the germ that the vaccine protects against. This is how the measles and flu vaccines work. When a weakened or small part of the virus is introduced to your body, you make antibodies to help protect against future infection.

That said, you can read and learn more about how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work in detail. But, do the COVID-19 Astra Zeneca and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccines cause blood clots? Well, let’s talk more about that below:

About Astra Zeneca and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccines blood clots

Globally, COVID-19 vaccines such as AstraZeneca and Johnson &Johnson/Janssen have been used to protect millions of people. Data is available from both clinical trials and preliminary data from country surveillance programs on their efficacy and safety.

Some mild to moderate side effects such as fever, muscle and headaches, soreness around the injection site, and tiredness are expected to affect some people after vaccination. These are normal indications that the body is developing protection.

There have been reports of very rare but serious cases of blood clots accompanied by low platelet counts (known as thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS)) occurring 3 to 30 days after vaccination with COVID-19 non-replicant adenovirus vector-based vaccines (such as the AstraZeneca and Janssen vaccines).

With the AstraZeneca vaccine, as of 15 July 2021, the data shows that these symptoms occur in about four to six people out of every million vaccinated (this figure varies based on age, sex, and geographical location)[2}. Younger adults appear to be at higher risk than older adults. More research is underway to understand the mortality rate.

Learn More: Flu Prevention | 5 Practical Tips To Avoid Common Cold

With the Janssen vaccine, as of 7 May 2021, the US Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had reviewed 28 reports of TTS out of a total of more than eight million people vaccinated. It is possible that there is a causal link between the vaccine and these symptoms, but more data is needed.

TTS is very rare; however, many common factors contribute to blood clotting health problems. Not all clots that occur after vaccination with Astra Zeneca or the Janssen vaccine will be due to TTS. The risk of blood clots is far higher from COVID-19 itself than from either vaccine.

If you experience a new, severe, persistent headache, blurred vision, chest pain, severe abdominal pain, leg swelling, or unusual skin bruising and shortness of breath between three to 30 days following vaccination, contact your doctor immediately. WHO has published interim guidance for clinical case management of TTS following vaccination in detail.

What about Vaccinated persons getting COVID-19?

Before we answer that, do COVID-19 vaccines contain microchips? Obviously not. For one thing, COVID-19 vaccines do not contain microchips. Vaccines work by stimulating your immune system. In order to produce antibodies, exactly like they would if you were exposed to the disease.

With that in mind, you can read and learn more about the ingredients in the OVID-19 vaccinations that are authorized for use. So, while COVID-19 vaccines have high levels of efficacy, especially against hospitalization and severe disease, no vaccine is 100% protective.

In addition to a vaccine’s specific characteristics, several factors such as a person’s age, their underlying health conditions, previous COVID-19 disease, current exposure to SARS-CoV-2, or the circulation of virus variants may have an impact on a vaccine’s effectiveness.

Learn More: Handwashing | Life is Better with Clean Hands – Campaign

We do not yet know how long immunity from different COVID-19 vaccines will last. Therefore, we must continue using all public health measures — that work to decrease exposure risks. Such as physical distancing, masks, and handwashing.

While a COVID-19 vaccine is most effective against serious illness and death, we are still learning more about its protection ability. To help keep yourself and others safe — while the vaccination is rolling out in your community — let’s continue to maintain at least a one-meter distance from others.

In addition, always make sure that you cover a cough or sneeze in your elbow, clean your hands frequently and wear a mask. Particularly, in enclosed, crowded, or poorly ventilated spaces. Always follow guidance from local authorities based on the situation and risk where you live.

You can learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and people who would like to have a baby in detail. In addition, you can also learn more about how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work in more detail.

Can I get magnetic after the COVID-19 Vaccination?

Of course, not. Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection.

Simply, because all COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals. Vaccine shedding can only occur when a vaccine contains a weakened version of the virus. Overall, if you need a new vaccination card, contact the vaccination provider site where you received your vaccine first.

Your provider should be able to give you a new card with up-to-date information about the vaccinations you have received. And, if the location where you received your COVID-19 vaccine is no longer operating, contact your state government. Or even the local health department’s immunization information system (IIS) for assistance.

The risk of Heart Inflammation (myocarditis or pericarditis) from mRNA

Globally, mRNA vaccines such as Pfizer and Moderna are protecting millions of people against COVID-19. A significant amount of data is available from both clinical trials and country surveillance programs on their efficacy and safety. Some mild side effects are expected after vaccination; these are a normal sign that the body is developing protection.

Eventually, there have been reports of very rare cases of both myocarditis — inflammation of the heart muscle — and pericarditis — inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart —  following the second dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. Such contributing factors include infections, viruses, medicines, and environmental factors.

Learn More: COVID-19 subcommittee of the WHO Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety (GACVS)

Currently, the available data suggest that there is also a potential relationship between these symptoms and mRNA vaccines. Research is underway to understand more. The symptoms of myocarditis and pericarditis are generally mild. Fast treatment with medication and rest can help to avoid long-term heart damage and death.

If you experience new and persisting chest pain, shortness of breath, or have a racing or pounding heartbeat within a few days of vaccination, contact your doctor immediately. Overall, the benefits of these vaccines greatly outweigh the risk of myocarditis and pericarditis by preventing deaths and hospitalizations due to COVID-19.

What Are We Still Learning?

Vaccines are widely accessible in health institutions. Everyone aged 12 years and older should get a COVID-19 vaccination as soon as possible. But, you can read and learn more (in this article) about how COVID-19 Vaccines get to you in detail. Fortunately, many doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and clinics offer COVID-19 vaccinations.

Additionally, parents can also check with their child’s healthcare provider about whether they offer COVID-19 vaccination. Most federal governments are providing the vaccine free of charge to all people living in their vicinity. Regardless of their immigration or health insurance status.

Related: MyDawa App | Quality Medicine & Healthy Products Online

People who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken their immune system may not be fully protected even if they are fully vaccinated. They should continue to take all precautions recommended for unvaccinated people (here) after all. Including wearing a well-fitted mask until advised otherwise by their healthcare provider.

So, what are we still learning? Quite, a lot! For example, the CDC is constantly reviewing evidence and updating guidance. Unfortunately, we don’t know how long protection lasts for those who are vaccinated. But, for sure, what we do know is that COVID-19 has caused very serious illness and death for a lot of people.

Meaning, if you get COVID-19, you also risk giving it to loved ones who may get very sick. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a safer choice.

Here is more about what we are still learning:
  • That the vaccines protect everyone
    • whether with weakened immune systems, or those taking medicines that suppress the immune system
  • It’s true that long COVID-19 vaccines protect people
  • many people have to receive the COVID-19 vaccination alike
    • that’s before the population is considered protected (population immunity)
  • effective the vaccines are against new variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 as well

One thing is for sure, COVID-19 vaccines are effective at protecting you from COVID-19. Especially, severe illness and death. They can also reduce the risk of people spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. If fully vaccinated, you can resume normal activities before the pandemic.

Many studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Therefore, getting a COVID-19 vaccine will also help keep you from getting seriously ill. Even if you do get COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines are the safer way to help build protection

As I mentioned, you should get vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. One study showed that unvaccinated people — who already had COVID-19 — are more than 2 times as likely as fully vaccinated people to get COVID-19 again.

Perse, you can learn more about the clinical considerations for people who were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies. Or convalescent plasma, or history of a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults or children (MIS-A or MIS-C). All in all, COVID-19 is still a threat to people who are unvaccinated.

Learn More: Quarantine | How is it different from Isolation?

Accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors. But, it can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, it’s good to check it. From credible sources like CDC’s vaccines and immunization web content.

Through subject matter experts’ approval, their web has well researched, written, updated content. And also, by various key entities too. Including physicians, researchers, epidemiologists, and analysts. Their content is based on peer-reviewed science.

CDC’s vaccines safety site is one of WHO’s 20 English language certified web sitesexternal icons. Therefore, as you surf for vaccine information, it’s good to consider guidance from the key sources.

Consider the following:

While it’s a useful tool for researching health-related issues, the Internet does not replace a discussion with a healthcare professional.

CDC leadership makes the final decision on the words. As well as the images, and links to best serve the information needs of the public. As well as healthcare providers, public health professionals, partners, educators, and researchers.

CDC’s NCIRD is a memberexternal icon of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Vaccine Safety Netexternal icon too. And it follows web content and credibility criteria defined by the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safetyexternal icon (GACVS).

What Pregnant Women Should Know

To help pregnant women make this assessment, they should be provided with information about the risks of COVID-19 in pregnancy, the likely benefits of vaccination in the local epidemiological context, and the current limitations of safety data in pregnant women.

WHO does not recommend pregnancy testing prior to vaccination. It also does not recommend delaying pregnancy or terminating the pregnancy because of vaccination. Neither does it recommend discontinuation of breastfeeding after vaccination.

Get Started: Covid-19 Registry | How To Register For Vaccination Online

But, above all, women can receive a vaccine at any point in their menstrual cycle. Clearly, WHO works with vaccine manufacturers, health officials, researchers, and other partners to monitor any safety concerns and potential side effects on an ongoing basis.

The majority of medical professionals can also best advise individuals on whether or not they should receive a COVID-19 vaccine. In addition to the general recommendations, each vaccine may have specific considerations for specific populations and health conditions.

Resources:

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